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Thread: dhofar

  1. #11
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    [quote="Jock2413"]As we prepared to leave, a helicopter crashed on take off. I never did find out if there were any fatalities.

    Flt Lt Peter Llewellyn Davis. MC, DFC, WKhM.
    Helicopter crashed on take off.
    march 1975.

    RIP
    LEST WE FORGET.

  2. #12
    Association Member Mercury's Avatar
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    We WILL remember them.
    GOD BLESS OUR TROOPS AND KEEP THEM SAFE

  3. #13
    Administrator Jock2413's Avatar
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    R.I.P. Brother.
    It was not for nothing. Knowing nothing at the time , I now know that this war wasn't some foreign office venture to manipulate a third world country but a genuine threat to our economic life. Better still...we won this one....but the usual bill had to be paid.
    You cannot fight a war with one hand tied behind your back.

  4. #14
    Sgt. Labalaba (MiD) was a Royal Irish Ranger. Even though he was wounded he stayed with their field gun and operated it by himself, moving it around, loading it and directing fire at the enemy. That very same cannon was a static display at St. Patrick's Barracks, but now sits directly outside my office window ... a constant reminder of bravery.

    Lest We Forget

  5. #15
    Administrator Jock2413's Avatar
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    The Mirbat Gun

    Jimmy Mac, I wondered where the Mirbat Gun, as it was known, ended up. It used to be on display at the Royal Artillery Museum at Woolwich. It was a 25 Pounder of WW2 fame. Normally it took a crew of six to serve. A number one in charge, a layer, a rammer, a loader and two ammunition handlers. For one man to load, aim and fire that gun over a sustained period whilst under fire must have taken a superhuman effort. And all he was awarded was a posthumous Mention in Despatches. Seems a bit paultry compared with the D.S.O. awarded to the officer in charge. It didn't end there though. That officer, now an S.A.S. Major, Mike Kealy died seven years later of exposure in the Brecon Beacons whilst joining in the Endurance March part of an S.A.S. selection.
    I think it was about 1984, myself and a mate who was with me out there visited the museum while waiting for the pub to open. As we got to the display, there was a troop of recruits from 17 Training Regt RA getting a lecture from a training NCO about the gun. One of the recruits asked where Dhofar was and the NCO bluffed the answer saying somewhere in the middle east. My mate and I just smiled at each other and walked out wearing that "I know something that you don't know" expression.
    You cannot fight a war with one hand tied behind your back.

  6. #16
    Admin/Membership Secretary/Treasurer On1on's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy Mac
    That very same cannon was a static display at St. Patrick's Barracks...
    Cannon? :) I do believe then that somewhere I have a photo of that "cannon" althougth there are some dubious characters next to it called SasQuack and Trackie...
    Visit tree 49/189 @ the NMA and say hello.

  7. #17
    That'll be the one Onion ... it sat opposite the Guard Room, just outside the cookhouse.

  8. #18
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    Jimmy. I don't no if you if you know.
    Capt Simon Garthwaite.
    Who was KIA Dhofar 12 April 1974, was Royal Irish Regiment.

    jock.
    the RAF where not just at Salalah, we manned the forward airstrips as well.
    the most notable being Midway later called Thumbrait, we also carried out mine clearance duties on the midway road.
    the RA gun line was 4 x 25pdr's and 1 x 5.5 inch FG. they were known as Cracker Battery and where a great bunch of lads, they also manned the green archer radar and hedgehog's A on their own and B&D with RAF Regt. C being RAF Regt only.
    a hedgehog was made of 45gal drums and sandbangs (thanks RE), and usually had
    2 x 81mm mortars, 1 x browning .5 hmg, 1 x gpmg, and a zb 298 radar

    the armoured recce sqn was SAF. commanded by seconded british officers and snco's.

    the bottom line is, there where a lot of different cap badges out there at one time or another, the highest british medals issued were the DSO or DCM.
    considering the act's bravery and heroism of British servicemen who served in the Dhofar and at time's died there.
    non of them got the recognition they deserved.
    i am saddened by this, and the apparent ease in which they handout gallantry medals these day's.

    PS. the MOD state 24 fell in oman, i have a list confirming 47 (CWWGC) at present not including contracted MOD civilians, and those awaiting to be confirmed (after nearly 30yrs?).

  9. #19
    Association Member/NIVA Merit Award Winner 2017/18 P-C's Avatar
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    Tuesday, 28 October, 2003,



    SAS appeal for memorial money

    Former SAS soldiers are appealing for the funds to erect a statue in memory of their fallen comrades.
    They want to place it in the special forces section of the National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas near Lichfield in Staffordshire.

    It would depict a Fijian and stand for all special forces soldiers who have lost their lives in combat.

    SAS and SBS troops are already being honoured with their own section of the arboretum, a plot of 110 trees due to be planted this winter.

    The soldier was called Laba and was killed in 1972 at the Battle of Mirbat in the Middle East.

    He was mentioned in dispatches and some of his former comrades have campaigned for him to be posthumously awarded with the Victoria Cross.

    The National Memorial Arboretum is dedicated to Armed Forces personnel and civilians who served in conflicts across the world.



    Were they successful??

  10. #20
    Administrator Jock2413's Avatar
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    Oh boy Wobbly, I'm back there now. The sounds, the smells all of it. The wake up call as the old boy called the faithful to prayer. The denim trousers with the wrap around ties and the green shirt with the built in ventilation holes complete with floppy hat that had to be worn at all times or risk being charged. The ZB298 for all those uninformed could detect a human body several hundred meters away. Trouble was it did the same for goats and donkeys!! I can vaguely remember 2 x 5.5s but I may have been seeing double due to sun glare. What I can remember is having a nice arrangement with the "paraffin budgie" jockeys. When the water delivery came up from the desalination plant (tasted horrible) in exchange for our labour, we got the grand tour on resup missions up to the Dianas. The only place we were not allowed was the FOB at Al Gw....something. The RA Major in charge of the battery did his nut and threatened all sorts but he was a typical REMF, the only guy who finished the tour without a suntan, so what he didn't know never hurt. The sheer magnificence of the Sultan's palace. Qaboos I think his name was. Sandhurst trained who ousted his father for the job. He bought this huge ocean going yacht and spent millions getting a channel dug from the sea to the palace so he could sail it up to the front door. The rumour was that he was paying the Foreign Office a fortune for the use of British troops. Not only British but Iranians and Pakistanis as well. Another rumour was that each officer when his tour was completed, was presented to the Sultan who awarded him a solid gold watch. What wasn't a rumour was that before we left, we were ordered to hand over any local currency (Rials I think) that we had for exchange and not to give it to the locals. A perfect case of the Tory mantra...keep the rich rich and the poor poor. Then it was crab air to Cyprus then British airways to Heathrow. And just to put the cream on it, customs gave us a right going over. They didn't find the two 0.50 cal cartridge cases I hid but they must have had fun searching through my socks and shreddies which were caked in sweat and sand. And to end this tale of woe, some scumbag had forgotten to arrange transport for us. We couldn't use public because of the weapons (once again in their GPO sacks) and anyway we had spent out on duty frees at Cyprus. Eight hours later we arrived at Woolwich to be greeted by "Who the f*** are you lot" and no accomodation so we spent the night ...in the cells. Welcome home from the war lads. My arse!!!!!!!
    You cannot fight a war with one hand tied behind your back.

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